Music & Lyrics by Cole Porter

Book by P.G. Wodehouse & Guy Bolton

New Book by Timothy Crouse & John Weidman

                        and Howard Lindsay & Russel Crouse

 

Concept returned to the Paget Rooms, Penarth, in March with the happiest of revivals of Cole Porter's classic musical. A light frothy story line, romance and gentle humour and a score packed with familiar hits makes Anything Goes - which first hit the Broadway stage in 1934 - a toe-tapping delight.

All the glitz and glamour was there in this fast moving and polished production by Paul Buckle played by a good looking enthusiastic company performing with assurance and bags of energy and sounding great. With an easy style and lightness of foot, Daniel Parker carried his numbers well as romantic Billy Crocker, stowaway aboard the liner SS America, to be near his love Hope Harcourt, attractively played and sung by Ingrid Bastable. Hope is chaperoned by her mother Evangeline, played with good presence by Helen Windsor, and her fiancé, the Woosterish Sir Evelyn Oakleigh, in an amusing blue-blood performance by Tim Brown. Also aboard is Billy's boss, wealthy Elisha Whitney, nicely played as a myopic inebriate by Nick Pratt. An impressive and energetic comedy performance by rubber-faced Richard Thomas, as Moonface Martin, public enemy No 13 (but with ambition), and a great 'gangster's moll' performance by Claire Couldridge as cookie-blonde Erma.

Evangelist nightclub singer Reno Sweeney made converts of us all in a rousing Blow Gabriel Blow, which shook the stage and rocked the theatre in a powerful performance by Alex Powderhill, accompanied by a temptation of (fallen) Angels 'broadly' played by Fay Crispin, Ellie Hoare, Heledd Lloyd and Lorna Welch. Cameos were well handled by Laurence Clarke (the ship's Captain), Ruairidh MacLeod-Lyon (the Purser) and Paul Buckle and Steve Davies as the Chinese Luke and John. Oh, and the Golden Bone award goes to the most docile of dogs, Mollie the Schnauzer. A great sounding four-piece band, under the direction of Nicola Rose, had the style and sound of the age and ensured the show kept toe tapping along. A wealth of elegant and pristine costumes, with fine attention to detail and hairstyles, perfectly evoked the period and the staging - 'slim-lined' down to one simple, but effective, set with good lighting, worked brilliantly. A well presented and played show, and a 'de-lovely' voyage.

 

 

Alex as Reno Sweeney

 

"Evangelist nightclub singer Reno Sweeney made converts of us all in a rousing Blow Gabriel Blow, which shook the stage and rocked the theatre in a powerful performance by Alex Powderhill"

NODA