Book By James Lapine

Music & Lyrics By Stephen Sondheim

 

NODA Review by Allan Mears on behalf of Dee McIlroy

Into the Woods, the James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim musical masterpiece that intertwines the plots of Charles Perrault’s fairy tales and Brothers Grimm. Many of Lapine and Sondheim’s collaborative work demands more from your average cast as they are littered with hidden meaning and depth. This somewhat complex plot could easily conclude at the end of Act 1, but it is the second half that demands the thematic understanding.  Morals, choices, growing up, parenthood, infidelity and dishonesty.

Gareth Tilley was perfectly cast as the Baker very well partnered by Helen Mussell as his decidedly flighty wife. Good depth to their characterisations and played with great gusto and chemistry.

Rhiannon Rose-Goodsir captured the witch perfectly. Rhiannon has always had a strong vocal ability and this performance was no different. Overall this was a very strong performance.

Supporting characters were clearly defined with strong delivery and vibrant interaction. Each role, whether large or small, was clearly and confidently portrayed.

 This was an innovative production and fully credit must go to the director Shane Rose-Goodsir who brought to the fore the most amazing characterisation.

The set, designed and constructed in-house, enabled the flowing movement of the players’ entrances and exits. Lighting plot was good.

This society likes to take on a challenge and they certainly conquered this one. This show was a worthy addition to the repertoire and showed the strength of the society’s cast of principals and the production team.

This society continues to shine a beacon for amateur theatre.

 

 

"Rhiannon Rose-Goodsir captured the witch perfectly. "

NODA

"This society likes to take on a challenge and they certainly conquered this one. This show was a worthy addition to the repertoire and showed the strength of the society’s cast of principals and the production team. This society continues to shine a beacon for amateur theatre. "

NODA